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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
's a mess and owes 18 billion dollars from hurricane katrina. i mean, this is an agency that cannot manage itself. the inspector general wrote a long report last year saying the agency is mismanaged, it doesn't have systems in place that can talk to states. they can't talk to each other, they don't have the right computers in place and let me tell you, they are managing more disasters all the time. president obama has called more disasters than any other president in the last 20 years. fema is not the organization. give it to the local states, they're the people who can make these decisions and spend the money wisely. >> neil: i don't dismiss the role of a federal presence disasters like these, but when bottled water can't arrive to a site and folks supposed to weather the storm close, at antithesis of what you're supposed to adopt and send e-mails to people who don't have powers and texts to phone to people who don't have phone service, you can't make this stuff up. >> that's the problem with bureaucracy and not letting states handle this. if anybody can more money, go out to staten islan
? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have tourists back in people in the city. >> host: ken budd, what were you doing for a living prior to volunteering? >> guest: i was an editor and i was an editor in washington dc and i am still doing the same job. >> host: how did you get all that time off? could use your vacation time. >> guest: yes, i use
probably the worst hurricanes in the gulf coast in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in
at the city of the site of a client. that city was new orleans. this was a few weeks after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to
of other disasters, from hurricane katrina, to joplin, now think of this. the people in all three of those places are reaching out to help those suffering in those regions tonight. tonight, their story from janet shamlian. >> reporter: hundreds of miles from the despair, everything from diapers to batteries, collected from the people of louisiana, meant for people in new jersey. >> we know what they're suffering in new jersey, we just wanted to do something to help. >> reporter: the effort started simply, at first, just messages of support. like these from hurricane katrina survivors, images that quickly went viral, then, more help. >> some of the first people we saw down here were firefighters from new york, the new york police department and folks from new jersey. everybody came down here and helped us, it is time to help everybody back. >> reporter: there is a similar feeling from joplin, missouri, which was devastated by the tornado. even people living in the fema trailers, the community wanted to help. >> it brought back a lot of memories. >> reporter: lisa dunn and her family lost th
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
. >> very interesting. i have a question, both lewis and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply
, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the things as a command and control tool that
the federal government to do whatever it takes to get this job done. this is our katrina. i expect the people of this state to be treated with the same level of compassion and generosity that the citizens of louisiana and mississippi and alabama were treated in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. >> to cope with the giant lines at the gas pumps, new york has followed new jersey's lead by issuing a mandatory gas rationing system. >>> coming up on the news edge at 11:00 a new journey for homeless vets, t first step towards a new home and a new beginning coming your way next. >> and gary's got your weekend forecast. got to say, this is sounding promising. >> i sure hope so, definitely real nice for both of these days, saturday and sunday. we'll look at it in detail coming up in the full forecast. >> coming up in sports can georgetown and maryland pull off the upsets of two top 10 teams? and on the nba hardwood tempers flare between the wizards and bucks. we'll explain why later in sports. >> is in fox 5 news edge at 11:00.  hey! y, baby. [ starts car ] were you eating sm
of losing your home is enormous and you know, after the hurricane katrina, we did hear similar noise with about, well, we shouldn't rebuild the lower 9th ward. in fact, there was never a sweeping federal policy to avoid rebuilding the lower 9th ward and it's been partially rebuilt and a lot of home owners privately made decisions, it's appropriate. on their own, i don't wish to continue with this, i can't do that again. and i think that's probably do something similar here. and let them make their own decisions and don't come in with sweeping policies and create some defenses from new york like colin has, you should not oversimplify oversweeping decisions here. >> weigh in on this, relocate or rebuild. >> there's a couple of interesting points that you brought up. one, if we allow the the government to dictate where people live. where does it stop? are they not allowed to live in the middle of the country in tornado alley, not allowed to live in california where their house could be consumed by a forest fire not allowed to live along the shores of the mississippi in case it floods. o
katrina, we did hear similar noise with about, well, we shouldn't rebuild the lower 9th ward. in fact, there was never a sweeping federal policy to avoid rebuilding the lower 9th ward and it's been partially rebuilt and a lot of home owners privately made decisions, it's appropriate. on their own, i don't wish to continue with this, i can't do that again. and i think that's probably do something similar here. and let them make their own decisions and don't come in with sweeping policies and create some defenses from new york like colin has, you should not oversimplify oversweeping decisions here. >> weigh in on this, relocate or rebuild. >> there's a couple of interesting points that you brought up. one, if we allow the the government to dictate where people live. where does it stop? are they not allowed to live in the middle of the country in tornado alley, not allowed to live in california where their house could be consumed by a forest fire not allowed to live along the shores of the mississippi in case it floods. one, the government should stay out of it, but there has to be some
. >> this is our katrina. and i expect the people of this state to be treated with the same level of compassion and generosity that the citizens of louisiana and mississippi and alabama were treated in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. >> michael graham told me out on staten island as well. more than half a million households are still without power. 40,000 homes on the rockaway peninsulas. deb fayerick is there and how angry are people? >> people are so frustrated and angry. it's been only 12 days since the storm hit. you're not too far from jfk. that light is basically illuminating a corner. that means there's no heat. boilers can't work. there are no washer triers, no way to charge a cell phone. no way to use a computer to access any sort of outside help, so they feel they're just being cut off here and they cannot understand why atlantic power authority, which is a state-owned company, can't get the lights on. we spoke earlier to couple of people at a rally and they were so frustrated. take a listen. >> restore the power to our community now! now! we're done! >> you know, and you just, yo
the devastation that is katrina without the bodies. >> we have to turn to lipa. president, vice president, we need people to take care of our community. they're screwing up! we're angry and we're not taking it anymore. >> if you can say something to lipa right now, what would it be? >> you stink. >> thank you so much for nothing. you're fabulous. >> one day they told us it was going to be maybe thanksgiving. so yes, it's very rough. very, very rough. >> there's no inspectors, we don't know where an inspector is, and we're not flooded. >> it's so bad that some local officials want the military and u.s. department of energy to step in and temporarily take over lipa management. lipa just can't hack it. a new york state investigation says that they neglected vital maintenance and did not budget enough for disaster response. paper maps like this one were pretty much state of the art, according to the report. paper maps they're using. lipa has lagged behind other utilities, not using smartphones tablets or even printers and fax machines. paper memos were preferred and slow dial up internet access the ru
for the red cross since hurricane katrina. so far the red cross has raised $117 million in donations for sandy relief. the west coast definitely stepped up to help the east coast. we want to thank you. with your help, we were able to raise nearly $180,000 for the red cross hurricane sandy relief fund during yesterday's telethon. and you can still make a donation by visiting our website, cbssf.com and clicking on the red cross link. >> it was fun working on that answering the phones. >> it was so neat to talk to people. it's amazing how generous people were. >> they really turned out. thanks. >>> all right. they are warriors with wounds you can't see veterans of iraq and afghanistan suffering from brain trauma or ptsd. a group of those veterans got a chance to try a new approach to their therapy in vallejo today. cbs 5 reporter da lin shows us how dolphins help the healing process. >>> reporter: they came home with invisible scars, psychologically traumatized by the combat experiences in the iraq war. >> it's personal. i'd rather not go into those. >> nice nightmares ray common occurrence. alth
. wide spread damage will likely make it the largest u.s. relief efforts since hurricane katrina. >> san jose police at the scene of a suspected homicide. authorities received a hang up call around 5:30 from a home on evangeline drive. officers found a woman's body inside of the home. >> police in a small eastern indiana town are investigating the death of a young woman from the peninsula who attended college there. authorities say ter ease hyman was hit by a train ask killed while walking with friends around 1:15 this morning. hyman was a senior ate├Ělt a sml quaker-affiliated school. >> investigators looking at a whether:/b[atters had anything to do with a two alarm fire in south san francisco on rock woothd drive at 10:00 this morning that damaged two homes before it was brought under control. neighbors say squatters have been scene in the neighborhood. >> redwood city electronic arts plan nose changes to a video game landing seven members of the navy s.e.a.l. team six in trouble. the navy punished s.e.a.l.s for consulting on the game. one was on a mission that killed osama bin laden
are the first major u.s. city to (inaudible) post katrina where he saw firsthand where a critical role these systems played in the city's recovery. i am honored to chair the council because i feel it's crucial that the public sector work side by side with our private sector partners to do everything we can today to ensure we will meet the needs of our residents in the days, weeks and years after a disaster. the objective of the lifeline council are to develop and improve collaboration in the city and county across regions regularly -- to develop and improve collaboration in the city and across the region by regularly convening a group of senior level operation officers of local and regional life line providers, understanding intersystem dependencies of enhancing planning, restoration and reconstruction, share information about the recovery plans and priorities and establish coordination process for life lines restoration and recovery following a major disaster. i'm going to go back to the last slide and just say today's conversation i want to focus around the specific challenges that
. >> this is our katrina. >> reporter: in new jersey and new york more than 4,000 residents are in shelters. nearly a quarter of a million people are still without power nearly two weeks after the storm hit. on long island, protests and anger that the utility company lipa hasn't worked quickly enough. >> we are cold, tired and we want our power now. >> reporter: today the agency says power has been restored to 93% of long island. meanwhile new york joined new jersey ordering gas rationing rules to help reduce long lines and frustration at the pump. this as hundreds of volunteers fanned out across neighborhoods including staten island to bring relief. part of new york city's designated volunteer day to help the thousands still dealing with sandy's destruction and showing the victims that they are not alone. >> thank you for helping. i appreciate it. >> reporter: homeland security secretary janet napalitano is scheduled to be back tomorrow. this time to visit a disaster recovery site in staten island. meantime, residents here are still waiting for the power to come back on. governor chris christie ha
and it would make it that second costliest storm behind hurricane katrina seven years ago. president obama is scheduled to visit the new york area next thursday to see the recovery operatio firsthand. the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and over again. and expecting different results. so how does this apply to obama's next four years in office? the green companies backed by your taxpayer dollars? they just grow and grow. many of them are hemorrhaging cash by the day. others have gone bankrupt altogether. our next guest is you can expect nothing but the same under this administration. a senior fellow joins us now. robert, always a pleasure to have you on the show. we assumed that it was safe to bet that the president would be doubling down on his green debt in his new administration. i hope he takes a different path. because we have seen solda and beacon power and a123 systems. it has been extraordinarily costly. i think a better path if he is interested in green technology to reform the research and development efforts at the federal level. so that f there is
. behind from sandy brings back memories of hurricane katrina, so two community leaders brainstorms on how they could help and they came up with the train of home. the passenger line travelled to newark, new jersey, it left yesterday carrying flashlights, batteries, blankets, baby formula, cold weather clothes, and it arrived in new jersey today. if you want to help victims in the northeast, it's so easy to do, just long on to cnn.co cnn.com/impact. >>> now that washington and colorado voted to make marijuana legal for recreational use, we'll tell you the impact it might have. oh no, not a migraine now. try this... bayer? this isn't just a headache. trust me, this is new bayer migraine. [ male announcer ] it's the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. >>> here is a sign of the times. voters in two states, washington state and colorado voted to legalize marijuana for recreational use. we're talking simply to get high. here is reaction from the legalization camp in colorado after the initiative passed this week. >>
correspondent in new jersey today. governor christie called hurricane sandy, our katrina. touring the jersey shore, and as residents of long beach island will be able to return tomorrow morning. the president obama and the speaker wasting no time in repeating themselves and their mistakes. >> this is an opportunity for the president to lead. this is his moment to engage the congress and work toward a solution that can pass both chambers. >> on tuesday night we found out that the majority of americans agree with my approach, and that includes democrats, independents, and a lot of republicans across the country. lou: with 52 days until the biggest tax hikes in history, can these two-man help find a solution? the "a-team" with the answers. the post-election fallout. obamacare, the law of the land. business leaders laying off workers. the rise of radical islam in the middle east, i cry for the return of sharia law. what it means for them and for us. the author of the extraordinary book. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of busines people l
just as we have the electorate. >> after katrina the media pinned all the blame on president bush. after sandy the media pinned all the blame on bloomberg. rudy guliani said fema was just as bad in the wake of sandy but it didn't make the media narrative. >> one thing they did promote. entitlement and greed and envy. this was from bain capital during the republican primary right up to the campaign. this appealed to a lot of people. you heard this in friday afternoon remarks post elections. unlike other post elections there were no reporters there. there were cheerleaders for him. >> jon: much more to come including an analysis of media treatment of republicans. >> president obama's a big loss for the g.o.p. but with the election out colonel and liberal media hit on the republican party? did any in the conservative press undermine the party's effort? the answers are next on news watch. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we p
. witt helped to straighten things out for katrina and folks on long island need results. back to you. >> jamie: you know who one of the people on long island is that actually lost power until recently is congressman peter king and he's going to join us, actually to tell us. you're right, he's fed up. >> reporter: he knows what he's talking about. he's living it. >> jamie: absolutely, and so hard here, peter. thanks for your report, keep us posted. >> reporter: will do. >> kelly: it has been hard here, drivers in parts of new york and new jersey are dealing with gas rationing. in new york city and on long island, odd-even rationing started just yesterday. the storm knocked out power to hundreds of gas stations resulting in long lines at the pump and over in new jersey, the governor is considering lifting the gas rationing now, a dozen counties have been under odd-even rationing for a week already. >> thousands of evacuees also in new jersey are calling a tent city home. something you wouldn't expect to see in our country. but the storm's victims as well as utility and rescue workers
invasive species cause up to $100 billion in damage in the u.s., more than hurricane katrina. >> we're looking for high risk cargo that comes into the country. >> reporter: this year the border patrol intercepted five insects never seen before in baltimore. some can be smaller than a grain of rice. >> you could have crops that are destroyed in the united states. you could have interception of a pest or plant product that can make people sick. >> reporter: just look at what the brown march march marma -- marmalated stink bug has done. the stink bug hit this mountain orchard hard this year. >> you can see when the stink bugs will have already sucked some of the juice out of the cell. >> reporter: he'll have to sell these apples for juice. >> it's more damage than i anticipated. >> reporter: and get the half the price he would for a good apple sold in stores. the problem with invasive pests like this is there are no natural predators here, so farmers have to spray to keep the crop damage down. that increases their cost, a cost which is passed on to you in the food you buy. >> how m
in this country occurred when we have the debt ceiling drama. not 9/11, i think katrina was the biggest, but the second biggest in the last four years was that event in terms of consumer confidence dropping. government, i think government right now, frankly, has been part of the problem, not part of the solution. it needs to provide, and, you know, almost regardless of what it does, it needs to provide some certainty and predictable to businesses and consumers so that they will function better and we will have a more productive economy. >> okay. so, heidi, steve has provided a very nice lead-in to bringing you into the conversation, and he said, you know, look, the u.s., the strength of the u.s. domestic economy, sorting out the fiscal situation is important not just for the u.s. and the world economy, but for the u.s. and the world full stop. >> right. >> you work at the state d., -- department, but you're the chief economist. what do you do? >> now they're laughing at her. [laughter] >> well, the role of the chief economist largely came out of a -- >> louder. >> your mic's not transmi
, new jersey filled with supplies gathered by victims of hurricane katrina. the box car was full of storm relief items, including batteries, diapers, dog food, and will go to residents in hoboken, new jersey, and other hard hit areas nearby. as the relief efforts continue, the will the weather continue? maria molina live with more on that. hi, maria. >> the weather has not really been cooperating a whole lot lately. we had the nor'easter that dumped some snow across portions of the northeast and those areas that were impacted very hard by sandy and very cold temperatures. over the next couple of days, we are going to start to notice a pattern shift with temperatures starting to warm up, especially during the nighttime hours. critical hours when temperatures drop below the freezing mark. take a look at sunday night, 48 degrees will be the low. by monday, a low of 50 degrees. a lot better than what we've been experiencing the last couple of nights. then tuesday into wednesday, we do have a front that does arrive, pushing in much colder air and then the nighttime temperatures in at
the relief effort for sandy is the largest in the u.s. since hurricane katrina. the red cross has raised around $117 million in donations and pledges. that came from fundraisers including nbc's telethon last week which brought in $23 million. the salvation army has also chipped in raising $5 million to help those affected by the storm. a lot of people just doing the simple thing of texting the red cross and making that $10 donation. every little bit helps. >> so easy. >>> time is 6:13. still ahead the facility opening its doors to help military vets find a job today. >>> and under water surprise. the great tale one man captured during a fishing trip. >>> plus the clumsy intruder caught on camera barging through a yogurt shop. >>> a reason to move the weekend plans outdoors. chuck's the reason. no. he is back with the mild weather forecast, next. it's my coffee when i want it. you press a button, you have great dunkin' coffee. i got my coffee for the morning, i got my dunkin' k-cup packs for the rest of the day. only available at dunkin' donuts restaurants. america runs on dunkin' coffee.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)